catastrophic-cuttlefish:

Princess Diana at The Labyrinth premiere

(via cups-of-tea-and-history)

bigblueboo:

sines and cosines (inspired by @geometricloci’s post)

(via fyprocessing)

supersonicart:

Afarin Sajedi.

Paintings by Afarin Sajedi:

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(via supersonicart)

prostheticknowledge:

SUCK THE BALLS!

Installation by Niklas Roy is a vast physical network of vacuum tubes and plastic balls which circulate within it - you can even have a ball shower - video embedded below:

“Suck the Balls!” lets people escape the daily grind and immerse into an endless, ecstatic play with thousands of little yellow plastic balls.

The installation consists of a ball pit and an 80 meters long pneumatic tube transport, which fills up the entire historic staircase of the Potocki Palace in Kraków. When entering the ball pit, the cabin’s lights switch on and the ball suction action starts! The visitor can operate the peculiar machinery with a suction spout. When sucking the balls which are surrounding his feet, the balls race through the transparent pipe system, creating a visually stunning scene. The journey of the little balls ends in a container above the ball pit, waiting for the climax of the operation: When the visitor pulls the release handle of the container, a fountain of balls splashes down onto his head in a joyful shower.

A helmet is provided to keep the hairstyle in excellent condition throughout the whole experience.

The installation is held at the Goethe-Institut Krakau from March 2014 until December 2014.

You can find out more about the project at Niklas’ website here

supersonicart:

Gael Davrinche.

Paintings by Gael Davrinche:

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(via supersonicart)

Uh…. wut? #wtf #wifi

Uh…. wut? #wtf #wifi

instagram:

The Making Of: Bookbinding with @pegandawl

For more from Margaux’s life and works, follow @pegandawl on Instagram.

For Philadelphia artisan Margaux Kent (@pegandawl), her love of bookbinding—and of Instagram—has its roots in journaling. Having made books since she was a child (“The first book that I made was called Circis Acters for Mommy. I must have been 6.”), she took up the craft in earnest after taking it upon herself to repair a beautiful book that had fallen apart.

Once preferring to build large-scale books, she turned to her signature miniature style as a matter of efficiency. “I use only antique and vintage leather to cover my books, so naturally, I had lots of gorgeous scrap,” Margaux explains. “I made a few miniatures to draw attention to my other journals one year at Renegade Craft Fair and they ended up selling first. I got into minis from there.”

Together with her husband, Walter, and a team of a few others, Margaux crafts for Peg and Awl, a small business creating products out of “treasures found and recovered from misfortune and neglect.” Her books and other handiworks—photographs, jewelry, writings and more—populate her Instagram account, which she sees as a new extension of her past journaling habits.

"When I used to write all of the time, I would write to my imaginary children and grandchildren of the future. I always had to have a someone out there who was reading," she says. "Instagram has become the voice that once belonged to the pages in my book. ‘Fill me! Identify something worth identifying!’"